What to Cook This Week

The family of a member of our little group that puts together our newsletter lost a relative in Pittsburgh this weekend, which means not only are we in mourning but that this is the first time we’ve published short-handed. We’d already decided to give you a newsletter focused almost entirely on recipes, and here they are: One is “Jewish”⎯ my grandmother’s potato “nik,” a shortcut version of latkes that I must make ten times a year. The others are just good, solid, seasonal, weeknight food. Take stock, cook, replenish, fortify yourself and your loved ones, and remember to vote.

— Mark


Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food styling by Katherine Sacks

This take on the classic couldn’t be easier: Instead of dredging and panfrying, just stack the ingredients in two stages on a baking sheet and broil. Done this way, the tomatoes get lightly roasted and the bread crumbs stay nice and crunchy.

FASTEST CHICKEN PARM


Sabra Krock for The New York Times

My grandmother’s shortcut on latkes, this has been a go-to recipe in my kitchen since I started cooking. Irresistible, and almost as good at room temperature as it is hot.

POTATO NIK


Part of the “more sauce, less pasta” philosophy, and perfect for this time of year, when the winter squash is really coming in.

PASTA WITH WINTER SQUASH AND TOMATOES


I’ve come to prefer this dish with sweet potatoes, but any winter squash will work, even your leftover pumpkin. It takes a while, but it’s not much work.

BEEF STEW WITH SWEET POTATOES


Talk To Me, Goose!

Questions, comments, brilliant suggestions? Just want to share the recipe for your grandma's potato salad, or your mom's meatloaf, or your uncle Drew's three-day 100-percent rye loaf (yes, please)? Don't hesitate to reach out anytime.