What's The "Best" Diet? We've Got The Answer

A few years ago, Dr. David L. Katz (my friend, frequent collaborator, and renowned health and nutrition expert) and I wrote this article for Grub Street called The Last Conversation You'll Ever Need To Have About Eating Right. It was really fun to work on, and I think it eventually became one of New York Magazine's most popular/shared articles ever. Turns out it wasn't actually the last conversation on eating right, because after that story was published, readers sent us tons of questions, which we could not ignore, so we wrote another piece to answer them, this time called (cleverly) The Last Conversation You'll Ever Need To Have About Eating Right: The Follow-Ups.

Predictably, that was also not the end of it. But this time, instead of writing another article, we decided to take the plunge and write a book. It's called How To Eat, it's out today, and I'm thrilled with how it turned out.

The book takes the same Q&A form as the original articles, which I think makes it especially lively and easy to read. In it, Dr. Katz and I try to take a no-nonsense approach to answering questions like these: What is the “best” diet? Do calories matter? When it comes to protein, fat, and carbs, which ones are good and which are bad? We cover dietary patterns (Just what should humans eat?); grains (Aren’t these just “carbs”? Do I need to avoid gluten?); meat and dairy (Does grass-fed matter?); alcohol (Is drinking wine actually good for me?); and much more.

I've dedicated my entire career to making everything about food and cooking as understandable to as many people as possible, and I'm proud to say that this book really makes a dent. Check out the excerpt below for a taste of what's in there (and don't miss our takes on sugar and alcohol). If you like what you find, you can order a copy here, or by clicking the big button below. Thanks so much, and see you Friday.

—Mark


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Questions, comments, brilliant suggestions? Just want to share the recipe for your grandma's potato salad, or your mom's meatloaf, or your uncle Drew's three-day 100-percent rye loaf (yes, please)? Don't hesitate to reach out anytime.