By Popular Demand: The Egg "Noodle" Video

In the spring, when flour was hard to come by (remember?), Daniel started making "noodles" out of super-thin omelets—basically, Japanese-style egg crepes—cut into strips. He wrote about it over on Heated, and I followed up with this newsletter. These are most often and maybe best used as a garnish for stir-fries, but you can also treat them more or less like actual noodles and toss them (gently) with all kinds of sauces. This is what they look like:

So many of you have asked for a video of the process that we’ve thrown one together. (By "we" I mean Daniel, who captured every step of the process, from cooking through turning them into a simple "pasta" dish, with tomatoes and garlic.)

In the original recipe, we suggested using a 12-inch nonstick pan, which gets you nice long noodles. That remains a good option, but you'll notice in the video that the pan Daniel is using is smaller. He’s got an Always Pan, which we've both been cooking with the past few months, and which we’ve both concluded has the best nonstick coating of any pan we've ever used. (And we’ve used a lot.) The pan is billed as being able to replace something like eight pieces of cooking equipment that you probably have in your kitchen, and is priced accordingly. I wouldn't go that far (I guess it kind of all depends on how you cook), but it's certainly versatile, and I'm in love with the coating, which the manufacturer says is proprietary, ceramic, non-toxic, and long-lasting. And for what it's worth, the pan, which is aluminum with a ceramic shell, is really good-looking.

Anyway, this is what we hope is the first of a series of quick instructional cooking videos from us. If there are any recipes we’ve mentioned, or anything you’re dying to see on “film,” let us know and we'll see what we can do.


- Mark

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Questions, comments, brilliant suggestions? Just want to share the recipe for your grandma's potato salad, or your mom's meatloaf, or your uncle Drew's three-day 100-percent rye loaf (yes, please)? Don't hesitate to reach out anytime.